Bradman Honourees

Each year up to two Bradman Honourees are chosen for his/her/their significant contribution to international cricket as exemplified by Sir Donald Bradman. The Award is issued specifically with regard to how much his/her/they reflect Sir Donald’s expressed values including courage, honour, integrity, humility and determination.

The honour is bestowed upon the recipient(s) at the Foundation’s annual Gala Dinner.

2006 Bradman Foundation Honouree
Norman Clifford O’Neill, b.1937 d.2008

Powerfully built and athletic, right-handed batsman Norm O’Neill burst onto the scene during the 1957-58 Sheffield Shield. In that season he was celebrated by the media as ‘the new Don Bradman’, when he scored 233 against Victoria in 244 minutes. At the conclusion of that summer end he’d tallied 1,005 runs at 83.75, becoming only the third Australian, after Bradman and Bill Ponsford, to top a thousand runs within a season in the Sheffield Shield.

O’Neill played Test cricket from 1958-59 until 1964-65 against England, Pakistan, West Indies, South Africa and India. In the 1960-61 Tied Test he scored 181 runs while during the 1961 tour of England he amassed the huge aggregate of 1,981 runs at an average of 60.03 which included 7 centuries.

  • Tests
  • 42
  • Agg
  • 2 779
  • 100’s
  • 6
  • Ave
  • 45.56
  • HS
  • 181
  • Wkts
  • 17
  • Runs
  • 667
  • Av
  • 39.24
  • B/B
  • 5/106

 

2007 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Robert Neil Harvey, b.1928

Robert Neil HarveyA left-hand batsman from Victoria, Harvey was just 19 when selected to first play for Australia against India in 1947-48. Precociously talented, he scored centuries in his first grade match, his first first-class game (for Victoria), his second Test appearance and his first Test appearance in England. He is still the youngest Australian to have scored a Test Century at 19 years 121 days (153 v India 1947-48).

He became a hero during the 1948 ‘Invincibles’ Tour when he came to the wicket to join Keith Miller at No. 5 with Australia at 3/68 chasing England’s first innings total of 496. In an innings of 112 runs, which Don Bradman described as ‘one of the greatest innings any batsman, old or young, has ever played’, he helped claw back victory from the jaws of defeat.

Neil Harvey played Test cricket until 1962-63 and aggregated more Test runs at the time than all previous Australian players except Sir Donald Bradman.

  • Tests
  • 79
  • Agg
  • 6 149
  • 100’s
  • 21
  • Ave
  • 48.42
  • HS
  • 205

 

2007 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Samuel John Everett Loxton, b.1921

Samuel John Everett LoxtonAn effervescent and gregarious man, Sam Loxton is one of only very few cricketers who scored a double-century on debut in first class cricket – 232* for Victoria v Queensland, 1946-47. As a highly capable all-rounder his aggressive batting complemented his fast-medium bowling.

He was a tremendous outfielder with a very strong throwing arm. Loxton played in four Test series; 1947-48 v India, 1948 v England, 1949-50 v South Africa and 1950-51 v England. During the 1948 Invincibles series he played in three Tests scoring 93 runs at Headingley while his sole Test century was made against South Africa at Ellis Park.

Sir Donald Bradman described him as a wonderful ‘utility’ player, strong in all areas of the game and a great asset for team morale.

  • Tests
  • 12
  • Agg
  • 554
  • 100’s
  • 1
  • Ave
  • 36.93
  • HS
  • 101
  • Wkts
  • 8
  • Runs
  • 349
  • Av
  • 43.63
  • B/B
  • 3/71

 

2008 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
William Alfred Brown, b.1912 d.2008

William Alfred BrownAlthough born in Queensland, Brown broke into first-class cricket playing for N.S.W., his family having moved to Sydney when he was three.  He was selected in the 1934 touring side to England where he made five centuries, including a memorable 105 in his England Test debut at Lord’s. He toured South Africa in 1935-36 and returned to England in 1938 when he was second only to Don Bradman in the tour averages.

After the Second World War he played against India in 1947-48 and was memorably run out for 99 in one of the games. During the 1948 ‘Invincibles’ tour of England he played three innings in two of the five Tests. Retiring from cricket at the age of 37, Bill Brown became a Test selector in 1952/53.

Widely respected and admired, Brown was a mentor and supporter of many young Australian & Queensland players freely giving his advice, experience and numerous humorous stories.

  • Tests
  • 22
  • Agg
  • 1 592
  • 100’s
  • 4
  • Ave
  • 46.82
  • HS
  • 206*

 

2008 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Arthur Robert Morris, b.1922

Arthur Robert MorrisA likeable and gregarious personality, Arthur Morris was regarded by Don Bradman as the finest of all left-handed opening batsmen.

Possessing a relaxed and correct technique that enabled him to adapt to varying conditions, Morris broke into the New South Wales season in 1940-41 in sensational fashion scoring 141 and 111. In 1946-47 he was selected for the Test series against England and made 155 in the 3rd Test and a century in each innings of the 4th Test. At tour’s end his average of 71.86 was second only to Bradman.

As a key member of the ‘Invincibles’ he excelled in the English conditions scoring 696 runs and topping the tour averages with 87.00. He played an absolutely crucial innings of 196 runs (the highest in Tests of the tour) during the 5th Test.

Morris continued to thrill crowds with his batting well after the 1948 tour retiring in 1955.

  • Tests
  • 46
  • Agg
  • 3 533
  • 100’s
  • 12
  • Ave
  • 46.49
  • HS
  • 206

 

2009 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Alan Davidson, b.1929

Alan DavidsonI shall always remember the glorious fluency and rhythm of his perfect bowling action, …the deceptive power of his driving especially over mid-off, and the incredible ability to pluck the ball out of the air when to lesser mortals it seemed already past him. – Sir Donald Bradman

Possessing great stamina and a determination to match, Alan Davidson regularly turned the game in favour of New South Wales and Australia with ball, bat and in the field. A true world-class all-rounder he could move the ball in both directions and was unnervingly accurate with his left-arm over the wicket fast-medium deliveries. No batsman in the world during his Test years could claim to play him with any confidence.

His batting was adaptable and he could hit out aggressively or protect his wicket as conditions demanded. And they frequently did. Batting with Graham McKenzie in the crucial Old Trafford Test during the 1961 series the pair scored 98 in a dogged last wicket stand to position Australia for an unlikely win that eventually secured the series. Conversly, in the 1960-61 Tied Test Davidson attacked the West Indian pace attack with impunity very nearly securing victory with his innings of 80 runs.

In the field Davidson moved like a panther taking sublime catches that earned him the nick-name ‘The Claw’ or throwing down the stumps to secure improbable run-outs.

Once retired from matchplay Alan has dedicated himself to supporting his beloved SCG and was an instrumental figure in the establishment of the Bradman Museum.

  • Tests
  • 44
  • Wkts
  • 186
  • Runs
  • 3 819
  • Ave
  • 20.53
  • B/B
  • 12/124
  • Inns
  • 61
  • Runs
  • 1 328
  • Av
  • 24.59
  • HS
  • 80

 

2009 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Dennis Lillee, b.1949

Dennis LilleeBursting onto the international scene in the final two Tests of the 1970-71 Australia – England series, Lillee’s extreme pace and eight wickets announced a significant talent. He cemented his spot in the Australian side the next summer against the Rest of the World XI that saw him take 8-29 on his home ground at the WACA.

In his early years Lillee’s approach to fast bowling was simple. Bowl as quickly as you can to unsettle the batsman and ensure you can sustain the attack through strength and fitness. His relentless training regimen quickly earned the respect of his colleagues. However, repeated bowling generated painful stress-fractures in his back and he broke-down during the 1972-73 tour to the West Indies.

Returning for the 1974-75 series against England, Lillee, together with fast bowling partner Jeff Thomson, literally terrorized the England batsmen with a barrage of accurate and intimidating fast bowling. Utilizing his natural athleticism, endless stamina, renowned competitiveness, and his unique ability to extract life from ‘dead tracks’, he established himself as one of the greatest fast bowlers of all time over the next few seasons.

He defected to World Series Cricket along with many key Australian and overseas players – a decision that vastly improved the appeal of this form of the game and eventually helped secure its success.

Once the feud between WSC and the ACB was mended in 1979, Dennis Lillee remained spearheading the Australian attack, his bowling maturing into flawless control reinforced by his strong mental approach that regularly secured him the wickets of the world’s top batsmen.

He retired in 1984 and has committed himself to coaching young fast bowlers particularly in India.

He is currently the President of the Western Australian Cricket Association.

  • Tests
  • 70
  • Wkts
  • 355
  • Runs
  • 8 493
  • Ave
  • 23.92
  • B/B
  • 11/123

 

2010 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Sunil Gavaskar, b.1949

Sunil (Sunny) Gavaskar is regarded as one of the best opening batsmen in cricket’s history. The Indian player’s intentions were announced in his debut Test in the West Indies when, aged 21, he scored 774 runs to help India win for the first time in the Caribbean in the 1970/71 Series.

For the next sixteen years Gavaskar was instrumental in developing his country’s dream of becoming a great cricketing nation. At only 165cm, the batsman is regarded as one of the most technically sound of his generation, and his infinite patience made him a formidable foe in Test matches. Equally proficient off front and back foot he was always beautifully balanced and boasted impregnable defence.

Gavaskar set many world records during his career, notably breaking Sir Donald’s record of 29 Test centuries. His mark of 34 test centuries stood for almost two decades before it was broken by his protégé Sachin Tendulkar. He also realised his ambition to score 10,000 Test runs.

“My view is that Sunny Gavaskar is the greatest batsman I have come across,” said Garry Sobers. “He has opened the innings against genuine fast bowlers like Michael Holding, Roberts, Croft and Garner. He has made more runs away from India – in the West Indies, Australia and England.”

After retiring in 1987, Gavaskar remained involved in cricket as a television commentator, analyst and columnist. He has also had responsibilities with the BCCI and served as Chairman of the ICC Cricket Committee.

Gavaskar is credited for teaching his teammates and their successors the virtue of unconditional professionalism, and he earned widespread respect for his courage and determination against hostile bowling. These qualities fit perfectly with the criteria for being a 2010 Bradman Honouree.

  • Tests
  • 125
  • Agg
  • 10 122
  • 100’s
  • 34
  • Ave
  • 51.12
  • HS
  • 236 no
  • Runs
  • 206

2010 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Adam Gilchrist, b.1971

Adam Gilchrist was the first player to master all three codes of cricket: Tests, ODI and Twenty20.

After entering international cricket in 1995, Gilchrist won fans with a combination of his exhilarating hitting and cheerful demeanor. He operated with a philosophy of ‘just hit the ball’, and confirmed his Test selection in 1999 with a debut game featuring 81 runs, 5 catches and a stumping. Later in that Test, he partnered with Justin Langer in Hobart to score 149 not out and 127 respectively to steal the Test from Pakistan.

One other display of strength came in the 2007 World Cup against Sri Lanka where he scored 149 off 104 balls: 13 fours and 8 sixes. Batting coach Bob Meuleman had advised him to put a squash ball in his glove to force him to hit straighter.

Perhaps the most memorable moment of his career was when he ‘walked’ before an umpire’s decision in a World Cup semi-final in 2003. “..as a player I had the ability to make the game, in a tiny little way, better when I left it than when I found it,” he explained.

Over his career Gilchrist has played Tests in every nation and has a batting average of at least 40 against every country except India (27.90). As a wicket-keeper, his 17 centuries and 5,570 Test runs are world records.

Gilchrist never placed personal success over that of his team. He is remembered not just for extraordinary run-making and safe wicket-keeping, but also for reminding all cricket followers that the integrity of the game is paramount. And that is what makes him a 2010 Bradman Honouree.

  • Tests
  • 96
  • Agg
  • 5 570
  • 100’s
  • 17
  • Ave
  • 47.61
  • HS
  • 204 no
  • Cts
  • 379
  • Stps
  • 37

2011 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Sir Richard Hadlee, b.1951

‘I had four key words that went through my mind when I was bowling, one was rhythm, the other was off stump, the other one was desire and the other one Lillee.’

Richard Hadlee is New Zealand’s greatest player and one of the world’s best all-rounders of any era.

As an opening bowler, his clinical ‘stump to stump line, high flowing action, superb follow through, and unwavering concentration defined his play . In contrast, his batting depended not on a carefully developed technique, but on a brilliant eye and natural timing. He swung the bat generously and regularly chanced aerial shots. Such was his power, that aerial hits always represented a reasonable risk.

One of five sons of former New Zealand Test captain Walter Hadlee, he first played for Canterbury in 1971-2 and toured England in 1973. In 1978 he’d become the acknowledged spearhead of the New Zealand attack and his hostile bowling in Wellington that summer did most to bring New Zealand to an inaugural victory over England. ‘Paddles’, Hadlee took 10 for 100 in the match and with 6 for 26 bowled England out for 64 in the second innings. In 1978 he joined Nottinghamshire, taking 36 wickets in six Championship matches at 14.47 runs per wicket. Together with South African fast bowler Clive Rice he was the primary reason for Notts winning the Championship after a 52-year wait. In 1984 he became the first player since Fred Titmus in 1967 to secure the 1000 run/100 wicket double in an English season.

In 1985/86 Hadlee developed from a very good fast bowler into a truly great one. An outstanding all-round performance against Australia, saw him take 9/52 in Australia’s first innings. A batting effort of 54 combined with 6 more wickets in the second innings, helped New Zealand to a crushing victory. He followed this up with 7 wickets in the second Test and 11 wickets in the third thereby giving his country its first series win on Australian soil. In a home series against India in 1989/90, Hadlee became the first bowler in history to take 400 Test wickets.

Before he retired from cricket in 1990 Richard Hadlee was Knighted for his services to the game becoming New Zealand’s first and only cricketing Knight.

  • Tests
  • 86
  • Agg
  • 3 124
  • 100’s
  • 2
  • Ave
  • 27.17
  • HS
  • 151 no
  • Wkts
  • 431
  • Runs
  • 9 611
  • Av
  • 22.30
  • B/B
  • 15/123

 

2011 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Bob Simpson, b.1936

‘I must say I got greater enjoyment out of coaching than playing. I took huge satisfaction helping players to become a truly good player… the reward of watching their game and seeing things you worked on coming down right and saving people’s careers was immense’.

Bob Simpson holds a unique place in Australian cricket succeeding as a player, captain, selector, coach and manager over a career spanning five decades.

Simpson is one of only 21 players in the history of cricket to have scored a triple Test century. He is also one of the finest slip fieldsmen of all time and has taken 71 Test wickets with his probing leg-spin deliveries. He’s risen to the challenge of restoring pride to Australian cricket not once, but twice separately as a captain and also as national coach.

As a sturdily built right-hand bat Simpson made his first class debut in 1952-3 when only 16. Brilliant footwork and lightening fast reflexes delivered through emphatic square cuts and forceful front-foot drives that occasionally delivered very big scores in the Sheffield Shield competition, first for his native New South Wales and later Western Australia.

His arrival at Test level was more restrained however and while he made his debut against South Africa in 1957-58, his first Test century wasn’t until the England tour of 1964. But what a century! At Old Trafford the Australian skipper hit a stupendous 311, over thirteen hours in duration, an amazing feat of endurance and concentration that prevented victory by England and kept Australia’s chances in the series alive.

An uncompromising captain Bob Simpson led Australia in 29 Tests between 1963-64 and 1967-68. Ten years later, when World Series Cricket took the finest Australian players away from the official game Simpson was still enjoying Grade cricket but was asked to again lead his country to give the inexperienced team some resilience and direction. Initially a difficult time, ‘Simmo’ doggedly built the team into a competitive force until eventually retiring after 10 Tests.

That wasn’t however his departure from Test cricket. In 1986, together with captain Allan Border, the pair formed one of Australian cricket’s finest partnerships and under their guidance moulded the unit through rigorous fielding, batting and bowling drills, into the tough, disciplined and professional team that secured the memorable Ashes victory in England in 1989.

Bob Simpson, truly a cricketer for all seasons.

  • Tests
  • 62
  • Agg
  • 4 869
  • 100’s
  • 10
  • Ave
  • 46.82
  • HS
  • 311
  • Wkts
  • 71
  • Runs
  • 3 001
  • Av
  • 42.27
  • B/B
  • 8/97

2012 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Glenn Donald McGrath, b.1970

I think the Australian way is … having respect for the game, playing good hard aggressive cricket…not becoming personal …giving everything you’ve got and being true to yourself, you never want to let your team mates down out there in the middle … and then walking off the field at the end of the day win, lose or draw, knowing you backed yourself, and knowing that you gave everything for your team.
TICHOF Interview 2009

Having taken 563 Test wickets, Glenn McGrath  is one of only two fast bowlers to join the elite ‘500 Club’. A lanky country boy from Naromine in central-western New South Wales, McGrath honed his talent at a young age by repetitiously bowling against a 44-gallon drum at the family farm’s machinery yard.

Sure of his skill, McGrath challenged himself in the formative Sydney Grade competition and quickly found success with his high stump-to-stump action, bounce and pace. He exuded a palpable sense of commitment whether representing his Club, State or Country and gave no batsman any quarter in the spirit of the true fast bowler. Always a thinking player, his ability to precisely control the ball subtly by varying its pitch and flight, even at good pace, made him one of the hardest to face and he challenged all the great batsmen of his time.

In the twilight of his career when his pace was fading he took his talent to a new height by what has been described as ‘metronomic precision’ to his bowling. In order to deceive the batsman he combined an identical approach, delivery and follow-through, ball after ball, with only the most subtle variations in wrist position.

Always an aspirational batsman, McGrath holds the unlikely world 3rd highest score for a No.11 after making 61 against New Zealand in 2004. Shouldering additional public attention during his playing days through his wife Jane’s battle with breast Cancer, McGrath now works tirelessly for the Foundation that bears her name.

  • Tests
  • 124
  • Ave
  • 21.64
  • Wkts
  • 563
  • Balls
  • 29 248
  • B/B
  • 8-24

2012 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Rahul Dravid, b. 1973

‘I’ve loved the game since I was a young kid…my earliest memories are of holding a bat and ball in my hand and wanting to play …I still get a buzz about competing in cricket and everything that goes with a match.’
TICHOF Interview, 2009

Already a cricketing statesman before he retired from Test cricket in early 2012, Rahul Dravid’s batting shone in a team of willow-wielding gurus that included Tendulkar, Sehwag, Laxman and Ganguly. Articulate and engaging, his persona is defined by a genuinely humble attitude which is underpinned by a considerable intellect.

This triumvirate of character strengths has enabled him to successfully negotiate cricket’s myriad challenges both on and off the field for sixteen years at the elite level. An engaging speaker he is the first non-Australian to deliver Cricket Australia’s Bradman Oration.

One of only two batsmen to have aggregated 13,000 Test runs, he is the only player to have scored a Test century in all ten Test-playing nations. Always a model of technique and fastidious concentration, the right-handed batsman from Bangalore became known as ‘The Wall’, so obstinate was he when at the crease. In 2001 when batting with VVS Laxman at Kolkata, the pair famously put on 376 runs against Australia after being forced to follow on to secure an improbable victory – Dravid making 180.

Dravid is proud of his role in helping India secure its status as the pre-eminent cricketing nation and remains conscious of his status as a role model in India. Rahul Dravid made 36 Test centuries, five being double-centuries, and completed 210 catches – currently a world record.

  • Tests
  • 200
  • Aggs
  • 15 921
  • 100s
  • 51
  • Ave
  • 53.79
  • HS
  • 248
  • Inns
  • 286

2013 Bradman Foundation Honouree
Mark Anthony Taylor, b. 27 October, 1964

Born in Leeton, Mark Taylor grew up in Wagga Wagga and after a long apprenticeship with New South Wales, announced his talents during the 1989 Ashes. Finishing the Tests with a series batting average of 83.90, he and fellow opening Australian batsman Geoff Marsh, memorably batted the entire day at the 5th Test at Trent Bridge without the loss of either wicket. Taylor eventually made 219 in a partnership of 329.

A leader nonpareil, Mark Taylor was one of the most accomplished batsmen of his generation. A gritty competitor he complemented his ability as an opening batsman with freakish skills as a catcher at slip. He inherited a fine team from Allan Border and soon refined it in his name and inspired long-awaited series success in the West Indies in 1994-95 and Pakistan in 1998. In all, he won 26 of his 50 Tests in charge.

The scorer of 7525 runs at 43.49 he arrested the attention of the international cricket community when he made 334 not out against Pakistan at Peshawar in to equal Don Bradman’s fabled hand at Leeds in 1930. Universally known as ‘Tubby’ because of his stocky build he was one of the game’s finest strategists and most astute diplomats – skills he deftly transferred to the commentary box when he retired after 104 Tests. He remains active in cricket administration.

  • Tests
  • 104
  • Aggs
  • 7 525
  • 100s
  • 19
  • Ave
  • 43.49
  • HS
  • 334*

2014 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Sachin Tendulkar AM, b. 24 April, 1973

sachBorn in Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India 24 April 1973 the peerless batsman of his time Tendulkar is the greatest accumulator of runs in history. In all probability his achievement of 100 international hundreds constitutes a mark, like Sir Donald Bradman’s Test average of 99.94, which will not be surpassed. Tendulkar made his Test debut at 16 and remained a member of the Test team until retiring at 41.

Similar in stature to Bradman, testament to his greatness was an imposing record against Australia, the pre-eminent team of his era: 3630 runs at an average of 55.00 with 11 centuries. At the age of 36 and 306 days he scored the first double century in one-day cricket. Intensely competitive he is the most worshipped cricketer since Bradman and carries the adulation thrust upon him with similar humility.

  • Tests
  • 200
  • Aggs
  • 15 921
  • 100s
  • 51
  • Ave
  • 53.79
  • HS
  • 248*

2014 Bradman Foundation Joint Honouree
Steve Waugh AO, b. 2 June, 1965

waughSTEVE WAUGH AO, born Canterbury NSW Australia June 2, 1965.

Statistically Australia’s finest captain with 41 victories (nine losses) from 57 matches, Waugh was an uncompromising and combative cricketer who introduced the term “mental disintegration” to the game’s ancient lexicon. Introduced to the Test arena at 20 when Australian cricket was at its nadir in 1985 in his mid-30s he led one of the country’s greatest teams to a record 16 consecutive Test victories. Such was his self-discipline and determination he played a then record 168 Test matches and amassed 10,927 runs at an imposing average of 51.06 with 32 centuries. And with Dean Jones he was a most influential and innovative limited-overs player.

Renowned for his philanthropy in Australia and India during his playing days he placed great store in the game’s history and initiated ceremonies and customs that have become a part of the lore of the game and have been faithfully followed by his successors.

  • Tests
  • 168
  • Aggs
  • 10 927
  • 100’s
  • 32
  • Ave
  • 51.06
  • HS
  • 200
  • Wkts
  • 92
  • Runs
  • 3 445
  • Av
  • 37.45
  • B/B
  • 8-169
bottom curve

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